SULFA
Surrey University Library for
Forensic Analysis
home videos forged about contact

SULFA has been published in the IPR 2012 the contents of which
have been made freely available stricly for academic purposes. The
Library consists of two parts.

  1. Original videos used to test algorithms for camera identification, device linking.

  2. Forged videos used to test forgery detection algorithms.

Licence & Usage

SULFA is a freely available forensic library, anyone wishes to use the content of this library should kindly accept the terms of usage which are:

  1. The sole purpose of this library is to be used only for Academic purposes and requires permission if the contents are to be used for any other purposes.
  2. Reference to our paper: "Qadir, G., Yahahya, S & Ho, A T S., Surrey University Library for Forensic Analysis (SULFA). In Proceedings of the IET IPR 2012, 3-4 July, London, 2012." is included in any published work using the provided data either as a whole or in parts.
  3. Contributing to SULFA: The library is open for external contributions. We will gladly include any contribution of videos that match our criteria. In order for a video to be included we request a signed release form as well as other information such as the source capturing device, frame rate, codec, and length (approx. 10s) . To contribute forged videos, we also request a full description of the forgery, including the software and tools used. It should also include 'difference frames' of the original and corresponding forged videos. All material can be sent to: sulfa@surrey.ac.uk.

 


Abstract

In this paper we propose SULFA (Surrey University Library for Forensic Analysis) for the benchmarking of video forensic techniques. This new video library has been designed and built for the purpose of video forensics specifically related to camera identification and integrity verification. As far as we know, no such library or similar currently exists in the community.

SULFA contains original as well as forged video files, which will be freely available through the University of Surrey’s website. There are approximately 150 videos collected from three camera sources, which are Canon SX220 (codec H.264), Nikon S3000 (codec MJPEG) and Fujifilm S2800HD (codec MJPEG). Each video is approximately 10 seconds long with resolution of 320x240 and 30 frames per second. All videos have been shot after carefully considering both temporal and spatial video characteristics. In order to present life-like scenarios, various complex and simple scenes have been shot with and without using camera support (tripod). Furthermore 9 original videos from each source in SULFA have been tested with Photo Response Non Uniformity (PRNU) based camera identification methods. Currently, SULFA also includes videos with cloning or copy paste forgery. Each forged video includes full information of the doctored region.


Van and a Car passing Original
Forged Sample (Forged)

 

© Department of Computing, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
sulfa@surrey.ac.uk